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Depict high and low level airways, navaids, holding patterns, and waypoints

1       Introduction 

Depict high and low level airways, navaids, holding patterns, and waypoints 

In this topic, you learn how to display information for high and low airways, navaids, holding patterns, and waypoints on the N-Tracking map. 

We estimate that this will take 8 minutes to complete.

2       Detailed explanation 

Adding navigational information to N-Tracking maps

Use the options on the lower half of the NAV Layers pane to display on the map either high and low:
 

        Airways

        Waypoints

        Holding patterns

        Navaids

 

You can use the High and Low level buttons to switch between the two levels, to match the flight level for which you want to plan.

For detailed information on adding restrictive and controlled airspaces and areas in which defined frequencies are used for flight communication, consult the topic Display restrictive airspaces, controlled airspaces, or communication areas. 

Before you begin your exploration of how to activate and use the NAV Layers, let's see them in action on the map. 

Zoom is set at 5 nm. 

Solid light green triangles represent navaids. 

Hollow teal green triangles represent waypoints. 

Interaction 1

In your operating environment, you can hover your mouse over the icon.

For the purposes of this training, click the icon. 

Interaction 1 Click highlighted solid green navaid icon.

N-Tracking displays the name of the navaid (JEN) and also identifies this as a navaid (NAV). 

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click highlighted waypoint icon.

N-Tracking provides the name of that waypoint (WPT) -- BUILT. 

Click another icon; this one to the south of SCX8941.

(Again, in your operating environment, you will hover your mouse over the icon.)

Interaction 1 Click highlighted waypoint icon.

N-Tracking identifies the TENAT waypoint. 

There aren't too many of the fleet flying at the moment.

Let's turn on the flight plan for flight SCX8941-- click the Flight Plan slider on the MY FLEET header.

Interaction 1 Click the Flight Plan slider.

The solid blue line indicates the ATC flight plan for this aircraft. 

For N-Flight Planning users, the gray dashed line represents the N-FP flight plan. 

Interaction 1

With the flight plan displayed on the map, you can investigate navaids and waypoints near that flight plan. 

Interaction 1 Click highlighted waypoint icon.

N-Tracking displays the waypoint name -- BUILT. 

Let's end this brief tour at this point and learn more about how to activate N-Tracking's NAV layers and use the information they provide.

For this next example, the map is re-positioned and the zoom level is set differently.

Let's start your exploration of adding navigational information to the map positioned over the U.K. and northern France, at a zoom level of 100 km.
 

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the Layers button.

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the NAV Layers tab.

Interaction 1

At the 100 km zoom level, all of the sliders are disabled (they're "grayed out").

You cannot use them. 

Interaction 1 Click Zoom in (+).

At the 50 km zoom level, some, but not all of the lower sliders become accessible. 

For users whose map scale is in nautical miles, the same applies at 50 nm.

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click Zoom in (+).

You can also use your mouse scroll wheel (or its equivalent) to zoom in on the map.

At the 20 km zoom level, all of the sliders are accessible. 

Now that you're using an appropriate zoom level to work with navigational information, practice using the sliders to add the different types information to the map and learn how you can use that information in your work. 

Start with turning on the Airways slider. 

Interaction 1

You can choose either high- or low-level airways.

In this example, Low is active.

Interaction 1 Click the Airways slider.

If you use the zoom control to change the visible map area, zooming may cause the airways to drop from the display again.

Rather than zooming, we recommend that you click and drag (pan) to re-position the map to show the airways in the particular area you want to investigate.

N-Tracking displays the low-level airways.

Interaction 1

Low-level airways display in cyan, as shown in this example. High-level airways display in white. You cannot display both levels of airways simultaneously.

Click on the airway in the square to see some detailed information on it.

Interaction 1 Click the cyan line (airway).

Interaction 1

N-Tracking displays the airway ident --T999. This airway travels from BKY (navaid) to SIVDA (waypoint) going forward, one way.
Let's see more detail.
 

Interaction 1 Click the AWY T999 list item.

 This indicates a one-way forward course to the navaid.

 This indicates no restriction on flight direction, both a forward and backward course to the navaid is acceptable.

 This indicates a one-way backward course to the navaid.

After you select an airway, N-Tracking presents course and headings information.

N-Tracking displays more detail, such as the distance and bearing to the next waypoint and flight limits. 

Remember to click on the cyan line. N-Tracking does not generate a list of airways unless you click directly on the line. 

After you select it, the targeted airway is highlighted in orange. This is particularly useful if you select a point where there are multiple airways intersecting on the map, making identification difficult.

 

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the Close button.

You can switch between the high- and low-level option whenever you like, but you cannot view information for both high- and low-levels simultaneously. 

Let's have a quick look at the high-level airways. 

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the High button.

High-level airways display as white lines. In the same way as you worked with low-level airways, you can select an airway for more details.

For now, let's move on to review waypoint information.

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the Airways slider.

High is selected, so let's have a look at some high-level waypoints.

Interaction 2Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the Waypoints slider.

High-level waypoints display as hollow black triangles. Let's select one to find out more information. 

Interaction 2 Click the black triangle (waypoint) icon.

The NAV information pane shows the waypoint name and its status (compulsory or non-compulsory). 

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the WPT STOAT list item.

 The hollow triangle icons represent non-compulsory waypoints.

 A triangle icon with a solid black interior represents a compulsory waypoint. (There are no compulsory waypoints shown on this map section.)

In the previous step, you selected a non-compulsory waypoint.  

After you click the name, N-Tracking displays more details, such as the waypoint latitude and longitude. 

Let's see if there are any differences for low-level waypoints.

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the Low button.

Low-level waypoints display on the map in cyan, in contrast to the black icons used for high-level waypoints. This is a key difference.

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the highlighted cyan triangle icon.

You may notice that the waypoint changes to black after you select it on the detailed information pane. This color change is only for highlighting. Do not confuse the change with it being a high-level waypoint.

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the Close button.

This non-compulsory waypoint is named HEIDI. 

Continue to explore other low-level navigational features. 

Interaction 2Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the Holdings slider.

Holding patterns display as gray loops, with an arrow indicating direction of flight.

Next, activate the Navaids slider to see how navaids and holding patterns work together. 

Interaction 2 Click the Navaids slider.

With both holding patterns and navigational aids displayed, you can view more detailed information on either the navaid or the holding pattern by clicking on them, just as you practiced with the previous features.

After you select a holding pattern or a navaid, it turns orange to highlight the element you're focused on.

 

The navaids do not change color or location if you switch between viewing high and low levels, but the related holding patterns may move. 

Interaction 2Interaction 1

Let's turn these layers off.

Interaction 1 Click the Holdings slider.

Deactivate the display of navaids. 

Interaction 2 Click the Navaids slider.

In the following example, switch from this introduction of the features of the NAV Layers to explore how to use these features when you have an active flight plan on the map. 

In the next example, we switch our focus to the U.S. and change the map scale unit to nautical miles (nm).

Flight SCX529 is flying somewhere over the U.S. 

By default, the aircraft's flight plan does not display on the map. 
You can change this.

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the plane icon (SCX529).

Activate the Flight Plan slider so that the flight plan continues to display after you close the Flight Details pane. 

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the Flight Plan slider.

Interaction 2 Click anywhere on the map.

The aircraft is going to encounter some turbulence. 

The current zoom level is too high for NAV layers to be active. Zoom in to view navigational information that you may use to direct the aircraft along a different path.

Interaction 1 Click Zoom in (+).

For more information, click the navaid located at the point where the flight plan veers to the south west. 

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the navaid (bright green triangle).

That navaid is named "REX" and six airways radiate out from it. If you were to direct the aircraft along a different airway, which other path might be an option? 

Click the cyan line that represents an airway east of the ATC flight plan. 
(Click on the line in the highlighted area.)

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the cyan airway line.

N-Tracking identifies the airway as V387, connecting REX and ONDEV. 

If necessary, would it make sense for the aircraft to move to this airway instead?

Interaction 1

Next, click the airway (cyan line) that veers back towards the southwest. (Click on the line in the highlighted area for this example.) 

Interaction 1 Click the cyan (airway) line.

N-Tracking identifies that airway as V43. It, in combination with V387 could offer an alternative path to avoid the weather system. 

With this information in hand, close the NAV information pane.

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click X (Close).

For the next part of this example, we change to a zoom level of 5 nautical miles and review the area around the previously highlighted navaid.
(Click the highlighted navaid.)

Interaction 1

Interaction 1 Click the light green navaid icon.

N-Tracking displays the navaid name (MFE) and the four airways that radiate from it. 

Interaction 1

Click another icon in that area -- the larger solid green icon (highlighted in this example).

Interaction 1 Click solid green triangle (navaid) icon.

That icon represents the compulsory waypoint PYRAN.

The airway that intersects that waypoint is V387. 

You have learned how to add high and low airway, navaid, and waypoint information to the map and how to use it with flight plans.

The lower portion of the NAV Layers pane features controls for more navigational information layers.

To learn more about those navigational tools, consult Display restricted airspaces, controlled airspaces, and communication areas.
 

 



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